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Reynard Custom Homes
  • Writer's pictureJack Baldwin

What to do if your custom home design won't fit your site?

For this home currently under construction in Dahlonega, GA, we'll look at how we developed our initial designs from floorplans the client shared with and how dealt with a few issues based on the site restrictions.


For this home currently under construction in Dahlonega, GA, we'll look at how we developed our initial designs from floorplans the client shared with and how dealt with a few issues based on the site restrictions. Designed by James Knight of Reynard Custom Homes.

As you can see from the image above, we based our initial designs on how the building may sit on the site. However, a few things could be improved based on the site restrictions. The highlighted grey area above is based on a 35 ft front setback and a 15 ft side setback. Unfortunately, the size and scope of the home sit over these established backlines, which means we would need to consider other layouts to adhere to these strict setbacks.


During design conversations, we explored elongating the home through the site while maintaining as much garden space as possible. This will make an already efficient layout even more so. Still, it would be necessary to ensure that the building adheres to site restrictions.


As you can see from the image above, we based our initial designs on how the building may sit on the site. However, a few things could be improved based on the site restrictions. The highlighted grey area above is based on a 35 ft front setback and a 15 ft side setback. Unfortunately, the size and scope of the home sit over these established backlines, which means we would need to consider other layouts to adhere to these strict setbacks.

We maintained the farmhouse look throughout the designs, and the front porch will stay for street presence. However, the rear and side porches varied as we played with the size of the home to fit it on the site. We also considered having the carport sit over the setback lines, but we needed to find enough space to locate it. This means that the driveway will travel the distance behind the home and finish in the west corner of the site.


We maintained the farmhouse look throughout the designs, and the front porch will stay for street presence. However, the rear and side porches varied as we played with the size of the home to fit it on the site. We also considered having the carport sit over the setback lines, but we needed to find enough space to locate it. This means that the driveway will travel the distance behind the home and finish in the west corner of the site. Reynard Custom Homes




As we were able to gain more space through a variance process, lowered the front setback because the site is smaller than the minimum size stated in the City of Dahlonega Code of Ordinances.

As we were able to gain more space through a variance process, lowered the front setback because the site is smaller than the minimum size stated in the City of Dahlonega Code of Ordinances.



After a successful variance and building permit approval process, the home is now under construction in downtown Dahlonega. Next time you're visiting wine country or panning for gold in the North Georgia mountains, come say "hi" to this quaint southern home full of charm and simple comforts.


 After a successful variance and building permit approval process, the home is now under construction in downtown Dahlonega. Next time you're visiting wine country or panning for gold in the North Georgia mountains, come say "hi" to this quaint southern home full of charm and simple comforts.

 After a successful variance and building permit approval process, the home is now under construction in downtown Dahlonega. Next time you're visiting wine country or panning for gold in the North Georgia mountains, come say "hi" to this quaint southern home full of charm and simple comforts.



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